It’s Our Job to Celebrate

By January 31, 2014Food, Insights

DESIGNTEAM

As a multicultural agency, celebrations translate to busy campaign months for us– and surprise! At any given point of the year, some culture has a big one. We are gearing up for Black History Month, but today is Lunar New Year and Blue Friday (Go Hawks!).

As such, our graphic design team is busy. What do you do when your team is busy? You honor them through means both digital (blog highlight) and traditional (free food). As unobtrusively as possible.

JOE
Favorite food to eat around the Lunar New Year:
Since they don’t sell any Korean food here in the ID… I’m gonna say my favorite LNY treat is popcorn chicken and bubble tea?
If it was the last LNY before the end of the world,
In Korea, Lunar New Year is about spending time with family, visiting relatives, eating traditional foods, playing traditional games, children bowing to elders and getting money… but since I grew up in the US, I only did some of this stuff, and it was usually on the Solar New Year I think. In Korea, people spend like 5-10 hours in bumper to bumper traffic to visit their relatives. Not really too attached to any LNY traditions, but if I had a year before the world ended, I would travel the world and see as much of it as I could before it was too late. Two things I want to see before I die are the Northern Lights and the Great Wall of China.

ABE
Favorite food to eat around the Lunar New Year:
I like niangao*. This stuff. Never seen it bought from a restaurant…usually made/cooked at home. So there.
If it was the last LNY before the end of the world,
I would go to karaoke and just sing Working for the Weekend for my last LNY -____-

HOWARD
Favorite food to eat around the Lunar New Year:
Turnip caaaakes (and mandarin oranges)!
If it was the last LNY before the end of the world,
Certainly not a tradition, but it would be nice to spend Lunar New Year with my Grandma and extended family in San Francisco, along with my immediate family. Also breaking tradition and giving out red packets** to everyone even though I am not married***.

*Niangao (年糕), a Chinese sticky rice cake with brown sugar
**Red packets or red envelopes (Cantonese: lai see, 利是) are envelopes of money traditionally given out by married couples and elders to single people, especially children. The tradition is widespread across East Asia with different names in different dialects and languages:
Mandarin: hóngbāo (紅包) or yāsuì qián (壓歲錢)
Taiwanese: angbao (紅包)
Japanese: otoshidama-bukuro (お年玉袋)
Korean: sae bae don (세뱃돈/歲拜돈)
Vietnamese: lì xì
***Ladies, control yourselves.